Tag Archives: writing

5 Years Later, 5 Things I’ve Learned.

Hi there!

Today is my fifth anniversary in publishing. In addition to being thankful for you coming on this journey with me, I want to share 3 things I have learned along the way as a published author.

First of all, I want you to know that I still consider myself a new author, but this journey has taught me a thing or two. I can share the glamour of holding your baby in your hand. Or yes it is glamorous, for me at least. But I want to share with you my transparent truth, it just might be yours as well.

5Years In Publishing

  1. Let your voice come naturally to you. I had to start with this because one of the things that stopped me in the beginning was I told myself I’d never sound as great as those who I’ve admired for years. Well, I was right, they are them and I am me. When God made each and everyone of us, He broke the mold, figuratively of course 🙂  So instead of trying to copy someone’s voice, hone the one that God gave you.
  2. The passion for your story will dwindle: The thrill of a new idea is always exciting. I have woken up many nights so excited. But as time goes on, the allure of these characters dwindle under the craft. The number one thing I do is to step back and let the characters loose. One of the reasons the passion may dwindle is the characters aren’t doing what I told them to do…free them but don’t throw away the story. You can’t fix a blank page.
  3. You will not feel like writing every day…and guess what? You don’t have to. I know you see those quotes all the time about “write everyday”, “a writer should be writing” while true, that’s an enormous amount of pressure. I do not write everyday, but I also don’t write only when I feel like either. I set goals for releasing a book and follow my word count action plan to get it done.
  4. Growing a platform takes time. It will not explode overnight. That’s just not how it works. You have to post consistently. You have to put up valuable content. You have to make an effort to build your platform every single day. But don’t be so busy looking for the masses that you forget those that are with you now. Nurture them and they will help you spread the word. I LOVE MY AFRO LUV BUGS, they are my rock readers and I’m so grateful to them.
  5. Writing/Authorship/Publishing are three very different things. Be clear about what you’re doing and who you are. Publishing is a business and should be treated as such.

Have you read my titles? Check them out here

Keep walking in the direction of your dream. It might not be writing but whatever it is, keep at it. Good things take time.

Peace & Blessing,

Unoma

 

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Writer Wednesday: 3 Persons in One

Character development is critical for an easy to read book. I absolutely love building my characters.

I always think of which celebrity I think most looks like my character… And I use Pinterest a lot to just pin what I see in my minds eye based on the characters essence. I’m so finicky about my characters 😀😀😀 sometimes it’s scary. I build extensive profiles going as detailed as to what elementary school they went to. I wrote a blog post on how to do this.  Part of the Family details the process I use to build my characters..

How do you build your characters? Drop me a comment let me know.

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Like what you read? Please share…

Be Blessed

Unoma

Writer Wednesday: The Voice & Your First Chapter

Over the past ten years, we’ve been inundated with a number of talent and reality shows. While I don’t particularly indulge in any, (personal preference & time) one that has caught my attention over the years is NBC’s The Voice.

Now if you’re like me and is always late to the party, The Voice is a singing competition where the contestant sings to a group of 4 judges who while they are singing cant see them. Simply put, blind auditions. The only thing the judge has to go on is…The Voice( brilliant naming right?) any ways. What I’m trying to say is that they accept or decline a person based on what they hear ONLY.

The-Voice-Season5

When I first started writing, it was drummed into my by the internet and a host of my wonderful mentors that the first page, in fact the first sentence of your manuscript is EXTREMELY important. It is all you have to hook your reader. At first I was like huh? why? but then as I have come to understand that the competition for the attention span of readers is being stretched by so many other means of entertainment or other authors. A new reader only has so much time to give you to prove yourself.

Just like with THE VOICE, the reader is more than likely judging the rest of your book by those couple of pages. Will they stick around? While I don’t really stress about the first line, I should, but hey I am picking my battles…I try to do justice to the first chapter. Here are some tips that can help.

Old vintage typewriter, close-up.

  1. Avoid too much detail: the setting and larger problem can be weaved into the story later but in those first couple of pages…less is more.
  2. Tension: The lack of tension is a fatal mistake. This is what will make the reader turn to the next page. If after 2 pages, they have no immediate question that they are just dying to find out the answer to, they will put the book down. Now here is where established authors have an advantage because readers already know to expect with their stories. But for fairly new( like me) or new authors there is no such luxury.  The flip side of this is not to create mayhem that will more than likely confuse the reader.
  3. Boring characters: While we shouldn’t know the character’s life story just there and then but there has to be something that makes the reader want to know more about them. Some amount of their identity should be revealed.
  4. Core Plot: Okay, since I’m an avid reader this is so important for me to…I cannot stress how important it is for me to read the first chapter of a book and know what the core of the plot is trying to answer…Give me something…
  5. Where : Am I in the 21st Century or the 18th? Is it Winter or Spring? Am I in America, Europe or Africa…I gotta know where.

Now this is a freebie. There is some arguments on the importance of the prologue in a story. A lot of people claim it shows laziness in the author. I think not. 2 of my books have prologues and they were short but needed. So if it’s needed…knock yourself out but don’t make it too long.

Readers any advice to authors on crafting the perfect first chapter?

Writers add the tips you use below.

Blessings

Unoma

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3 Ways I Take Readers From Here to There

As you know by now, my books are mainly set in Nigeria or most recently Kenya and some US cities. When a reader tells me that when they read my book they felt like they were there..in Nigeria or Kenya I smile.

passenger plane flying on beautiful  dusky sky

Apart from the obvious compliment, it means I have done my job. You see apart from the Nigerian cities & Atlanta, I haven’t been to some of the other cities I write about. And I write for an international audience. It is a tricky to balance being authentic to my work and giving the reader an enjoyable experience.

Here are 3 things I do to take my international audience from here to there;

  1. Characters & Plot: I aim to weave tales where the plot and character interaction is universal.  So although there may be certain concepts that are different to my readers, I don’t get too detailed about the details of the customs. That’s what book discussions are for  🙂
  2. Scenery & Setting: I try to describe the location, village or city the story is set in only once. I don’t want my reader stuck in trying to figure it out but I try not to short change my readers either. Earlier on in my writing, I struggled with over description but that’s what good editors are for.
  3. Theme: Whether my characters are from the East, West, North or South they share something in common. They struggle with their faith and are need to be restored. The common theme in all my books are faith, hope & love…those are universal themes.

Of course at the end of the day, I’m that writer that fuses faith, romance & African spice 🙂 , so I give my readers what they expect when they pick up one of my books…entertainment,romance, faith filled fiction, and the ability to learn something different about the culture…that I do through dress, food, music & language.

Those are my little tricks… if you are a reader, is it important for you to feel the true essence of the book without getting lost? If you are a writer, how do you take your readers to places you have never been?